Covid-19: Digital health at risk as well as physical health

Working remotely has become a standard today.

While the professional world has long feared cyberattacks, this fear has certainly increased. Indeed, many people are forced to work today from home, and as we know this is not done to fix information systems, especially when we know that hackers are always on the lookout. They might as well serve them on their silver tray a gateway into your system.

This article will also interest you: COVID-19 and Telework: a safety issue for experts

Security practices that have long been advised even before the pandemic are still relevant. But the major problem remains the discipline of users of digital services. Individuals continue to use their personal tools in the workplace even though this has been repeatedly mentioned as dangerous and can be responsible. So how can we get out of this health crisis without leaving a feather on the aspect of cybersecurity.

Apart from the users themselves, the digital tools used to facilitate remote exchanges in the professional setting have also shown in recent times their inadequacies. This is clear, there is no such thing as unfailing security, but the problem remains and seems virtually impossible to manage. With the Internet using twice as much as before, should we expect the worst? "Millions of employees around the world are currently working remotely. They then turn to video conferencing tools to satisfy their commercial and social commitments.But such an influx of users will always attract the attention of security researchers as well as that of malicious actors who search for and discover vulnerabilities on high-traffic platforms, albeit for very different purposes. Chris Hodson, the head of information systems at Tanium, a security service platform. "As this widespread telework has appeared uner anticipated, some employees use their personal devices to do their jobs. And this is one of the biggest vulnerabilities in the corporate network. Companies have moved quickly to adapt to telecommuting, but few have integrated employee laptops, tablets and mobiles into their update management programs, which could leave company data exposed. Even the least sophisticated attack can take advantage of these unsecured devices," he points out.

To best combat rampant cybercrime, he will give some necessary recommendations to enable companies to limit as best as possible by referring to the basic problems that this one faces: "For companies to operate safely, they need a perfect view of all the devices connected to their networks. However, they are struggling to gain full visibility of their IT assets.

Our latest study shows that more than 70% of IT managers discover unknown client posts or servers every week. However, it is impossible to protect what we cannot see. (…) Security and IT operations managers need to unite to reduce risk. Only an overview of all computers, applications and data – including unpatched and therefore vulnerable machines, as well as their location – can prioritize and pay immediate attention to exposed customer positions.

Now access an unlimited number of passwords:

Check out our hacking software