Canadian Foundation's Twitter account attacked

The Canadian Epilepsy Foundation has been the target of an unknown hacker's computer attack, specifically its Twitter account.

To this end, it has filed a complaint against "an unidentified group for a coordinated attack on its Twitter feed. ». According to the foundation's statements, unidentified users made publications that could cause seizures in others who followed the foundation's account if they had a form of photosensitive epilepsy. The computer attack took place obviously last November, in the middle of a national campaign to fight and raise awareness of epilepsy. The perpetrators then took advantage of this moment to carry out their misdeeds "when the greatest number of people with epilepsy and epileptic seizures were likely to follow our publications," the foundation said.

He had more than 30 accounts that were involved in this rather inappropriate act. "This attack is similar to that of a person carrying a lamp strobe at a conference of people with epilepsy. The intention perpetrators is to cause crises and thus cause harm to the important to the participants," said Epilepsy Foundation's Director of Legal Representation, Allison Nichol. She later added: "The fact that these attacks took place during the month of the national epilepsy awareness campaign point out that they are reprehensible." In addition, "The Foundation cooperates fully with law enforcement and intends to use all the means available to ensure that those responsible are held accountable fully responsible. »

According to the Canadian Foundation, this combined attack that was directed against his account Twitter is quite similar to the one that targeted author and journalist Kurt Mr. Eichenwald. Indeed, in retaliation, in exactly 2016, he received a Tweet from a unknown user, with an animated strobe light. This tweet followed message that said: "Your publications deserve a crisis epilepsy." The consequences were, of course, obvious given that the journalist did have an epileptic seizure that put him in bed for several years days. By the force of things, the individual responsible for this wrongdoing was later apprehended by the police. His case is being tried. Looks like he'll plead guilty.

It's no doubt for this reason that the Canadian Foundation and several other organizations in battle and for years for social networks to such as Facebook and Twitter can turn off auto-playing GIF messages or other video posts.

So far, there has been no reaction from the social network. The investigation is ongoing and so far the perpetrators have not yet been identified. Which will obviously be soon. Would the request of the Foundation and other groups be legitimate then?

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